Energy Efficiency

Ten organisations spanning a broad spectrum of NSW businesses have been recognised as part of a NSW Government initiative to recognise outstanding achievements in energy productivity.

Delivered by the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) in partnership with the Australian Alliance to Save Energy, the inaugural Energy Productivity in Action event held in Sydney in June celebrated real-world examples of organisations that have improved their business performance through better use of energy.

With OEH support, the ten organisations achieved combined annual bill savings of more than $3.3 million, including a reduction in energy use by 42,300 MWh. In the process, these businesses have also unlocked productivity benefits, including reduced machinery downtime, increased throughputs, improved staff wellbeing and deferred need for plant upgrades. Action Matters is a program run by OEH.

Watch the case study videos here

Visit the Action Matters website here

Despite being considered as the most cost-effective way to effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions, convincing business, governments and individuals to adopt energy efficiency measures has been challenging.

Energy efficiency and its benefits are often misunderstood.

Energy efficiency is relatively intangible, which restricts a greater understanding of its potential. Companies and individuals usually invest in assets and products that they can see, feel and touch. Governments tend to support programs that generate jobs and create technologies for export. The challenge is to change this way of thinking so that energy efficiency is considered as beneficial process.

Efficiency is also incorrectly associated with sacrifice, but what it really means is that consumers use less energy while preserving their lifestyles or even enhancing them.

A²SE is working to address these challenges and more through a range of Activities

The fastest, cheapest way to cut emissions

Energy efficiency has been proven as a simple, cost-effective way to reduce carbon emissions and is available now using safe, existing technologies. Implemented on a large-scale, energy efficiency could provide Australia with 55% of its greenhouse gas abatement by 2050, much of it at an economic benefit.

But Australia’s energy efficiency potential is still waiting to fully realised and continues to face on-going challenges

Why energy efficiency works

Energy efficiency offers many more benefits than just reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Energy efficiency can:

  • cut electricity bills, saving money for all energy users – small and large
  • decrease demand on electricity networks during peak periods
  • reduce the need for costly network infrastructure
  • be implemented now using existing technologies
  • ‘buy time’ for other carbon reduction solutions to be developed

Energy efficiency statistics

  • The International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2009 estimates that energy efficiency measures will provide 65% of world emissions abatement to 2030.
  • A 2007 ABARE study estimated energy efficiency would directly account for 55% of Australia’s abatement by 2050, much of it at an economic benefit.
  • McKinsey’s 2008 analysis estimates that by 2030 up to 100Mt of mostly energy efficiency measures (about 1/6 of Australia’s 2005 total emissions) could be delivered at zero or negative cost.
  • The Australian Sustainable Built Environment Council’s 2008 building sector analysis estimates that approximately 60Mt of abatement (over 10% of Australia’s 2005 total emissions) is available from energy efficiency in the building sector alone to 2030, at a profit of $130 per tonne.

 


[m1]Hyperlink to Energy efficiency > Challenges

Despite being considered as the most cost-effective way to effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions, convincing business, governments and individuals to adopt energy efficiency measures has been challenging.

Energy efficiency and its benefits are often misunderstood.

Energy efficiency is relatively intangible, which restricts a greater understanding of its potential. Companies and individuals usually invest in assets and products that they can see, feel and touch. Governments tend to support programs that generate jobs and create technologies for export. The challenge is to change this way of thinking so that energy efficiency is considered as beneficial process.

Efficiency is also incorrectly associated with sacrifice, but what it really means is that consumers use less energy while preserving their lifestyles or even enhancing them.

A²SE is working to address these challenges and more through a range of activities .